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2020 Buildings-GSR

Global Status Report - Executive Summary

The Global Status Report for Buildings and Construction asks the central question ‘Is the buildings and construction sector on track to meet the Paris Agreement Goals?’ It tracks global progress on key indicators for energy use, emissions, technologies, policies, and investments globally.

Download here the previous editions:

 

 

Global Roadmap for Buildings and Construction

 

Global Roadmap for Buildings and Construction

The Global Roadmap for Buildings and Construction helps set pathways to decarbonization of the buildings and construction sector by 2050. Developed as a framework and a process, they present a comprehensive approach to emission reductions from the built environment along the full life cycle, with aspirational short and medium term and longer-term targets and timelines towards achieving zero-emission, efficient and resilient buildings and construction between 2020 and 2050.

This document builds on the Global Roadmap towards Low-GHG and Resilient Buildings. Click below to download it:

 

Below, you can download all three Regional Roadmaps: Africa, Asia and Latin America. 

Africa Roadmap

 

Asia Roadmap

 

Latin America Roadmap

 

 

Other Knowledge Products

 Adopting Decarbonization Policies for the Buildings and Construction Sector NDC guide

 

Database

2021-01-06 | ULI
The ULI Blueprint for Green Real Estate

Real estate organizations recognize the strong business case for incorporating environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors into their normal business operations with the increasing public focus on climate change and its impacts, new policies affecting building energy performance, and pressure from investors. In addition, strong returns from utility savings, tenant demand, new opportunities to access capital, and other value-creation opportunities are spurring investment in sustainability and energy efficiency.

Building on the leading sustainability work that Greenprint member organizations have been implementing since 2009, this Blueprint is for real estate owners and investors looking to develop or accelerate a sustainability program, and developers looking for ways to integrate sustainability into their overall development strategy.

2021-01-04 | Interreg MED
Policy Recommendations for a Mediterranean Building Renovation Programme

The Efficient Buildings Community has just developed a new set of recommendations for European and National decision-makers. 

The eight recommendations are grounded in the experience of the Mediterranean local authorities and they aim to bring the lessons learned in the discussion about the next generation of energy policies: the European Green Deal, issued by the Commission last December, and the recovery plans in response to Covid-19, currently underway in each Member State. 

The Efficient Buildings Community calls for a stronger vision for building-related policies, a proper "Mediterranean efficient buildings action programme“. Policy-makers need to acknowledge that energy efficiency in the Mediterranean countries relies on other parameters than in the rest of the EU.

 

2020-12-18 | Judit Kockat (BPIE) Sheikh Zuhaib (BPIE) Oliver Rapf (BPIE)
A methodology for tracking decarbonisation action and impact of the buildings and construction sector globally

Background and objective
This paper develops a methodology to track decarbonisation in the buildings and construction sector
worldwide. A set of individual indicators is used to identify trends in decarbonisation action and
impact. The methodology is based on the OECD approach for developing composite indicators1 and is
applied to data collected from the existing GlobalABC Global Status Reports and other sources to
create the Buildings Climate Tracker or ‘decarbonisation index’, a composite indicator. The approach
and methods are described, discussed and extended in this paper.


Objective of the tracker
The primary objective of the tracker is to show the efforts made towards – and the impact of –
decarbonisation of buildings worldwide, using suitable and reliable data aggregated in a transparent,
consistent and continuous way.
In the context of the tracker, the definition of the term “decarbonisation” and its measurement go
beyond mere observations of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and reflect the efforts made by
policymakers, governments, regulators, industries, and other key institutional and regional actors
towards the decarbonisation of the building and construction sector globally.


Scope of the tracker
The Buildings Climate Tracker focusses on the decarbonisation of buildings worldwide. In its current
state it considers indicators related to building construction, use and renovation, but it excludes the
demolition phase and social indicators such as living conditions or housing shortages.
While the focus is on the climate change mitigation of the building sector (i.e. reduction of CO
2
emissions or energy savings), the tracker also contains information about adaptation and resilience to
climate change. Some measures such as building codes incorporate and address all three aspects – i.e.
mitigation, adaptation and resilience – by outlining the requirements for new and existing buildings
to face current and future risks accordingly.

 

2020 Buildings-GSR
2020-12-16
2020 Global Status Report for Buildings and Construction

The Global Status Report for Buildings and Construction is a reference document of the Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction (GlobalABC). The fifth edition of this annual snapshot of the progress of the buildings and construction sector globally towards the achievement of the goals of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, particularly on the drivers of CO2 emissions and energy demand globally and the status of policies, finance, technologies, and solutions that support a zero-emission, efficient, and resilient buildings and construction sector. This year’s Buildings-GSR features input from over 110 GlobalABC members and experts from all regions: a true collaborative effort, building a global community. This year’s Buildings-GSR shines a light on the disruptions of COVID-19 and some of the responses in 2020, and includes a snapshot on emerging key issues: materials, nature-based solutions, health, and cooling for resilience. It also introduces a new index to track progress in decarbonisation in the sector – the Buildings Climate Tracker (BCT).

While the total final energy consumption of the global buildings sector remained at the same level in 2019 compared to the previous year, CO2 emissions from the operation of buildings have increased to their highest level yet at around 10 GtCO2, or 28% of total global energy-related CO2 emissions. With the inclusion of emissions from the buildings construction industry, this share increases to 38% of total global energy-related CO2 emissions. The slightly lower proportion of buildings emissions compared with the 39% seen in 2018 was due to the increases in transport and other industry emissions relative to buildings.

2020 Buildings GSR
Sources: (IEA 2020d; IEA 2020b). All rights reserved. Adapted from “IEA World Energy Statistics and Balances” and “Energy TechnologyPerspectives".

Authors: Dr. Ian Hamilton and Dr. Harry Kennard from University College London (UCL) and Oliver Rapf, Dr. Judit Kockat and Dr. Sheikh Zuhaib from the Buildings Performance Institute Europe (BPIE), with support from Thibaut Abergel and Michael Oppermann from the International Energy Agency (IEA), and support from Martina Otto, Sophie Loran, Nora Steurer and Natacha Nass from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) for the Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction (GlobalABC)

 

Click on the link below and download:

- 2020 Buildings GSR FULL REPORT

- Executive Summary

- Media Assets: Press ReleaseAmplification toolkit, Infographics on the 2020 Buildings-GSR_v1Infographics on the 2020 Buildings-GSR_v2

 

2020-12-03 | BPIE
On the way to a CLIMATE-NEUTRAL EUROPE

Findings of this report show that doubling the overall energy renovation rate of 1% is insufficient to achieve more ambitious GHG emission reductions of 55% compared to 1990 levels.   In reality, Europe needs to reach a minimum 3% annual deep renovation by 2030 to achieve the 60% emissions reduction in buildings, which is what the Renovation Wave highlights as needed to meet a 55% climate target and keep the EU on track towards climate-neutrality. 

Alongside with reducing energy consumption through building renovations, accelerating renewable energy penetration together with a systemic fossil-fuel phaseout, is paramount to decarbonize the building sector. Our paper finds that renewable energy must increase to 53% of the final energy mix in buildings, while fossil fuels must decrease to 47% total by 2030. 

2020-11-12 | UN Economic and Social Council
Updated Framework Guidelines for Energy Efficiency Standards in Buildings

The Joint Task Force on Energy Efficiency Standards in Buildings developed the Framework Guidelines for Energy Efficiency Standards in Buildings (ECE/ENERGY/GE.6/2017/4), and in 2017 the Committee on Sustainable Energy and the Committee on Urban Development, Housing and Land Management endorsed the document. To deploy the Framework Guidelines for Energy Efficiency Standards in Buildings and to set in motion the process of setting up international centres of excellence and a consortium of educational and research institutions, and thereby to accelerate transformation of the world’s building stock, the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe launched a programme on high-performance buildings.