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2022-11-04
Danfoss

The Whitepaper: The neglected demand side of the green equation, published by Danfoss during COP27, highlights:

  • Without urgent action, energy demand will grow significantly, getting us off track to meet global climate goals. Instead, according to IEA a collective push for energy efficiency can deliver one-third of the total emissions reductions needed to reach net zero.
  • Cooling is a global blind spot in climate change mitigation. As economies grow and adapt to a warmer climate, especially in the Global South, demand for cooling will make the second-largest contribution to the overall rise in global electricity demand over the coming decades.
  • Energy efficiency is an enabler of electrification. To grow the role of electricity in the energy mix it is a fundamental, yet overlooked, fact that we need to reduce energy demand first. An early analysis found that for every dollar spent on energy efficiency, we can avoid spending more than 2 dollars on energy supply.
  • Most of the global reductions in carbon emissions through 2030 needed for net zero come from technologies readily available today. This paper presents concrete policy measures to increase energy efficiency across sectors.

Download and read more here 

2022-07-25 | Dr.-Ing. Mira Conci, Alicia Carvajal, Oliver Burgess, Alexa Waud, Juan Lopez Aranguren, Jacqueline Oker-Blom, Celia Puertas, Charlotte May, Manuel Alméstar, Rufus Grantham
EIT Climate-KIC

EIT Climate-KIC and partners have designed the Handbook: Bio-Based and Circular Buildings for Healthy, Clean Cities as an interactive manual and a tracking instrument. It contains information resources and step-by-step processes to help and align local stakeholders’ efforts around reducing embodied carbon emissions in buildings, understand and explore circular practices, and influence changes in the supply chain towards bio-based materials, such as timber – which are more sustainable than the current use of concrete and steel. 

The Handbook supports all actors in the building’s value chain to understand metrics used for decision-making . In doing so, it enables stakeholders to develop benchmarks, to track and evaluate indicators over time; to visualise the processes involved and understand how they need to evolve to lead to different outcomes ; and finally, to create models for collaborative decision-making towards shared goals.

2022-06-01 | Irene Garcia
Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance, Laudes Foundation

This document was elaborated by the Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance (CNCA) and Culmer Raphael under the project "Dramatically Reducing Embodied Carbon in Europe's Built Environment", which CNCA launched in 2021 with the support of the Laudes Foundation. The purpose of this document is to serve as a communications material that city staff can resort to when raising awareness of the importance of addressing embodied carbon and increasing the uptake of bio-based materials among their city-department peers.

Download it below.

2022-06-13
European Union

Level(s) is a European framework to help built-environment sector professionals assess and monitor the sustainability performance of buildings. If you operate an assessment or certification scheme in the European Union, the publication "Level(s), A common language for building assessment" can help you understand how Level(s) complements your work. 

If you are interested in Level(s) but unsure where to start, don’t worry. The Level(s) eLearning programme will help you to get going. The eLearning programme is also the perfect resource for users with some experience of Level(s) who want to improve their understanding in one or more aspects of the European common language for sustainable buildings.

If you are using Level(s), the European framework for assessing the sustainability performance of buildings, you can access the European Commission’s free Calculation and Assessment Tool (CAT) to help you create Level(s) assessments for building projects. CAT is there to support you to complete life cycle assessments using Level(s) during the different phases of building design, construction and maintenance or de-construction.

2022-03-28
GlobalABC Secretariat

The GlobalABC was founded as an umbrella or meta-platform – a network of networks – that brings together initiatives and actors along the entire buildings and construction sector value chain at COP21 in 2015 by a group of governments, businesses, intergovernmental, and non-profit organizations, at the initiative of the French government and UNEP. In the nearly six years since its launch, GlobalABC has created and continues to maintain a neutral, member-driven platform, growing from an initial 79 members to 200 members as of November 2021, among which 34 countries. Its mission and vision are to connect governments, the private sector, and organisations to drive the transformation towards a zero-emission, efficient, and resilient buildings and construction sector to achieve a future-proof world for all buildings – both existing and new.  GlobalABC members exchange knowledge, discuss challenges, and collaborate on tools and solutions for rapid decarbonisation of the built environment. In doing so, GlobalABC advocates for, helps develop and implement pathways, policies, strategies and initiatives for reducing climate impacts across the buildings and construction sector. It hereby focuses on both climate mitigation and adaption in support of a net-zero carbon, energy efficient and resilient sector.

Download the 5-year review to look back at the achievements of the GlobalABC and its community since its creation at COP21, and discover how the GlobalABC has succeeded in mobilizing all actors in the sector to raise the profile of buildings for climate action internationally, regionally and locally, to keep track of the progress in decarbonizing the sector and to support countries in transforming their policies through buildings and construction roadmaps. 

2022-02-03 | GlobalABC
GlobalABC Secretariat

Founded at COP21, hosted by United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and with 238 members, including 36 countries, the Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction (GlobalABC) is the leading global platform for governments, private sector, civil society, research, and intergovernmental organizations committed to a common vision: A zero-emission, efficient and resilient buildings and construction sector.
 
The GlobalABC aims to:

  • Be a global advocate and a catalyst to action: GlobalABC advocates for market transformation and focuses on catalysing action by defining a carbon neutrality strategy for the built environment.
  • Be a trusted platform to set targets and track progress: GlobalABC tracks progress in its annual Global Status Report for Buildings and Construction (Buildings-GSR), and its Building Climate Tracker, a new index to track progress in decarbonization in the sector.
  • Support countries in setting priorities and measures based on their situation: GlobalABC develops policy guidance and global and regional buildings and construction roadmaps outlining aspirational targets, timelines, and key actions for essential policies and technologies, and, offering a model for national and city-level buildings and construction roadmaps to support and raise the ambition of NDCs.

Download the brochure to learn more.

2021-06-17 | ADEME
ADEME

Le rafraîchissement urbain est un sujet récent et les connaissances produites par la recherche et les premières expérimentations donnent des résultats divers, parfois difficiles à décrypter pour les acteurs opérationnels.
Ce guide propose une approche synthétique, multicritères et opérationnelle des solutions émergentes ou éprouvées, adaptées à différents contextes climatiques et urbains. Il s’agit d’éclairer la décision des acteurs publics et privés, tant sur leurs choix d’aménagement, de construction, de rénovation des bâtiments que d’aménagement des espaces extérieurs.

Téléchargez la synthèse du guide ici!

2021-05-21 | GlobalABC Secretariat
GlobalABC Secretariat

This is an updated brochure that brings a snapshot of the goals and work of the GlobalABC.

2021-05-19 | Rob Bernhardt

The question of cost comes up when discussing any form of change, whether it be automobiles, cell phones or better buildings. Throughout history, humans have bettered their life through innovation, delivering better products for less money, yet a pervasive assumption persists in the construction sector that improvements to building efficiency, durability, resilience or health will negatively impact affordability. The opposite is in fact true, yet the assumption continues in many circles.

To address this assumption, I have frequently been asked for costing studies to demonstrate the affordability of highly energy efficient new buildings. The “better costs more” narrative assumes, for example, that energy efficiency requires adding stuff to buildings, thereby increasing cost, rather than designing them differently to achieve better outcomes. This article is written to provide a response to those concerned about the cost of climate and people friendly new buildings.

2021-05-11 | Helen Naser, Anna Zinecker, Christiana Hageneder
PEEB

PEEB, together with the Work Area Finance of the GlobalABC, published a briefing on the EU taxonomy and its meaning for buildings. 

The EU Taxonomy aims at pushing the financial and industrial sectors towards more investments for climate neutrality in the EU. It does so by establishing a classification framework of sustainable investments. This allows investors to identify which investments are sustainable and can be marketed as such, increasing transparency. 

For buildings, technical screening criteria were developed for the construction of buildings, renovation of buildings, sale and ownership of buildings, installation of energy efficient equipment, or for manufacturing in the supply chain. Demonstrating compliance with these criteria requires collecting data and information – likely more than usually available.

The impact of the EU taxonomy is reinforced through a new corporate sustainability reporting directive and a sustainable finance disclosure regulation, which will likely require disclosure against EU taxonomy metrics. It is relevant mainly for actors outside the EU but spillover effects on other markets and jurisdictions are expected.