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2022-06-28 | Chandana Sasidharan, Ishan Bhand, Varun B Rajah, and Vish Ganti
Roadmap for Demand Flexibility in India
Alliance for an Energy Efficient Economy

Demand Response (DR), in simple terms, refers to the ability of load to change according to the grid requirements and is not a new concept in the Indian regulatory ecosystem. DR, is a method that enables the adjustment of demand, thereby allowing customers to participate in responding to changing grid conditions. The application of DR, a proven demand management tool, can effectively help electricity distribution companies (DISCOMs) in India handle their increasing future electricity demand and operate reliably in a greener grid. This paper discusses DR’s value proposition for the distribution grid and the steps to unlocking this value.’

To sustain operations in the future and achieve the goal of affordable and reliable energy supply, DISCOMs need to think beyond EE programmes and take a proactive role in engaging with consumers. In this regard, DR presents a leapfrog opportunity for DISCOMs to adapt to the realities of a cleaner grid and high electrification of demand. In the next three years, DR needs to be integrated into the fabric of DISCOM processes, along with EE. In the future, with the proliferation of more energy-efficient and controllable loads, DR programmes need to be designed with real-time applications. The future of demand resources lies in embedding DR value within the EE programmes.

Read the report here

2022-06-28 | Tim Mandel, Lukas Kranzl, Eftim Popovski
Quantifying Energy Efficiency First in EU scenarios: implications for buildings and energy supply
Enefirst

This report provides quantitative evidence on the Energy Efficiency First (EE1st) principle by investigating the level of end-use energy efficiency in the building sector that would provide the greatest benefit for the European Union in transitioning to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by the year 2050. Three scenarios are modelled and compared in terms of energy system cost to determine the extent to which society is better off – in pure monetary terms – if end-use energy efficiency in buildings was systematically prioritized over energy supply. 

The report emphasizes that at least moderate levels of energy efficiency in buildings are needed to cost-efficiently achieve net-zero GHG emissions by 2050. Even such relatively moderate levels will have to go much beyond business-as-usual trends. In addition, the study presents ample reason to support higher levels of ambition. Most notably, end-use energy efficiency in buildings reduces the capacities and associated cost of generators, networks, storage and other energy supply technologies. 

2022-06-28 | Tim Mandel, Lukas Kranzl, Samuel Thomas
Energy Efficiency First and multiple impacts: integrating two concepts for decision-making in the EU energy system
Enefirst

The objective of this report is twofold. First, based on an expert workshop and a literature review, it aims to integrate the state of knowledge on the concepts of EE1st and MI. This concerns the theoretical interlinkages between the two concepts as well as the possible role of different decision-support frameworks (e.g. cost-benefit analysis) and evaluation perspectives.

Second, the report provides evidence on the magnitude of selected MI from a model-based assessment for the EE1st principle in the EU-27. Three scenarios are compared for the MI of air pollution and indoor comfort. We find that factoring in MI certainly affects the trade-off between demand-side and supply-side resources, making it critical to include them in model-based assessments in the scope of EE1st

2022-06-24 | Jesse Glicker, Zsolt Toth and Jonathan Volt (BPIE), Maarten De Groote and Paulina Rodriguez Fiscal (VITO)
Positive Energy Neighbourhoods: Drivers of Transformational Change
BPIE

In light of EU climate goals and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, significant measures are needed to decarbonise the economy, reduce energy use and future-proof the building stock. With 75% of Europeans living in urban areas and a rising focus on existing buildings to achieve full decarbonisation by 2050, there is significant opportunity and need to focus on innovative solutions in neighbourhoods and homes, beyond the individual building level. Successful decarbonisation of the EU building stock calls for an integrated, participatory and neighbourhood-based approach.

Read the full paper here

2022-06-20
Africa Energy Outlook 2022
IEA

Today’s global energy crisis underscores the urgency and magnitude of the task of transforming Africa’s energy sector, as well as the benefits of an accelerated shift to more affordable and cleaner sources of energy.

The Africa Energy Outlook 2022 is a new special report from the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook series. It explores pathways for Africa’s energy system to evolve toward achieving all African development goals, including universal access to modern and affordable energy services by 2030 and nationally determined contributions.

The report analyses infrastructure expansion needs, investment requirements, financing options and energy policy priorities. It also explores a shifting fuel mix that supports resilient development, opportunities for new exports, and just transition issues – including energy access, affordability and employment.

2022-06-15
Renewables 2022 Global Status Report
REN21

Despite the promise of a worldwide green recovery in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, this historic opportunity has been lost. REN21’s Renewables 2022 Global Status Report sends a clear warning that the global clean energy transition is not happening, making it unlikely that the world will be able to meet critical climate goals this decade. The second half of 2021 saw the beginning of the biggest energy crisis in modern history, exacerbated by the Russian Federation’s invasion of Ukraine in early 2022 and unprecedented global commodity shock.  

“Although many more governments committed to net zero greenhouse gas emissions in 2021, the reality is that, in response to the energy crisis, most countries have gone back to seeking out new sources of fossil fuels and to burning even more coal, oil and natural gas,” said Rana Adib, REN21 Executive Director. Below are some highlights from the report:

  • The share of renewables in global energy use stagnated in 2021, despite record additions to renewable power capacity. 
  • Rising energy consumption and a hike in fossil fuel use outpaced growth in renewables.  
  • The Ukraine war exacerbated a global energy crisis, creating windfall profits for fossil fuel companies while billions of people face the threat of energy poverty. 

 

Read the full report here

2022-06-03
Putting a stop to energy waste: How building insulation can reduce fossil fuel imports and boost EU energy security
BPIE

This study shows how improving insulation can reduce energy demand and drastically cut Russian oil and gas imports for heating in buildings. Investing in building renovation can reduce the use of fossil fuels for heating in buildings, reaching 44% in gas savings, save 45% of final energy demand and substantially contribute to securing the EU’s energy needs.

2022-06-02 | Monika Henn
Renewable Energy Strategies for Real Estate
Urban Land Institute (ULI)

The path to decarbonization in real estate requires the integration of a renewable energy strategy, including both installed onsite and purchased offsite clean power. There is a strong business case for renewable energy, including lowering energy costs or reducing cost volatility, strengthening the utility grid, improving resilience, meeting net zero goals, and increasing tenant demand. However, there are challenges to assessing opportunities, deal structures, and financing mechanisms that limit market uptake. The Renewable Energy Strategies for Real Estate Report aims to help real estate practitioners understand the business case for renewables and develop a strategy to identify, prioritize, and execute renewable energy deals both on site and off site.
Renewable energy is not a new concept or startup technology. All types of buildings with varying ownership models and lease structures have been able to generate or procure renewable energy. With increasing stakeholder demand for sustainable real estate and a growing attention on setting net zero goals, renewable energy will play a large role in buildings of the future.

2022-03-28
Decarbonising Buildings in Cities and Regions
OECD

Accounting for nearly 40% of global CO2 emissions and sometimes as much as 70% in large cities, buildings and construction are central to the low-carbon transition. Decarbonising buildings, especially the old stock, through energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy use, not only reduces carbon emissions, but also generates co-benefits in health, energy affordability and the labour market. Additionally, global mega-trends and the transition to a green recovery from COVID-19 provide impetus for stakeholders to take action. Cities and regions have a key role to play and can leverage prerogatives in regulation, public procurement and stakeholder engagement, while addressing multiple governance, capacity and funding gaps. To accelerate and scale up their action, cities and regions need to work with national governments to create an effective governance mechanism. Drawing on the findings of a dedicated survey of cities and regions of all sizes from both OECD and non-OECD countries, this report explains their significant role, explores sub-national policy measures, identifies key obstacles, and provides policy recommendations and a checklist for both national and subnational governments to drive the decarbonisation of buildings in cities and regions.
 

Download the report here!

2022-02-11 | UNFCCC, GIZ, PEEB, BPIE
Compendium on GHG Emissions Baselines & Monitoring: Buildings sector Versions
UNFCCC secretariat

This volume on the building and construction sector provides an overview of the different sources of GHG emissions from the building and construction sector, as well as methodologies for quantifying these emissions to feed into the preparation and reporting of national GHG inventories. By better understanding the sources of emissions over the whole life cycle of buildings, it thus provides guidance on the most appropriate and effective mitigation strategies and policies for decarbonizing the building and construction sector based on national circumstances. We are optimistic that the guidance contained in this volume will be of some help to developing country Parties to make informed choices when setting building and construction sector emission reduction targets; implementing climate change mitigation actions and reporting on them in their national communications,biennial update reports and in future, biennial transparency reports.

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