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2020 Buildings-GSR
2020-12-16
2020 Global Status Report for Buildings and Construction

The Global Status Report for Buildings and Construction is a reference document of the Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction (GlobalABC). The fifth edition of this annual snapshot of the progress of the buildings and construction sector globally towards the achievement of the goals of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, particularly on the drivers of CO2 emissions and energy demand globally and the status of policies, finance, technologies, and solutions that support a zero-emission, efficient, and resilient buildings and construction sector. This year’s Buildings-GSR features input from over 110 GlobalABC members and experts from all regions: a true collaborative effort, building a global community. This year’s Buildings-GSR shines a light on the disruptions of COVID-19 and some of the responses in 2020, and includes a snapshot on emerging key issues: materials, nature-based solutions, health, and cooling for resilience. It also introduces a new index to track progress in decarbonisation in the sector – the Buildings Climate Tracker (BCT).

While the total final energy consumption of the global buildings sector remained at the same level in 2019 compared to the previous year, CO2 emissions from the operation of buildings have increased to their highest level yet at around 10 GtCO2, or 28% of total global energy-related CO2 emissions. With the inclusion of emissions from the buildings construction industry, this share increases to 38% of total global energy-related CO2 emissions. The slightly lower proportion of buildings emissions compared with the 39% seen in 2018 was due to the increases in transport and other industry emissions relative to buildings.

2020 Buildings GSR
Sources: (IEA 2020d; IEA 2020b). All rights reserved. Adapted from “IEA World Energy Statistics and Balances” and “Energy TechnologyPerspectives".

Authors: Dr. Ian Hamilton and Dr. Harry Kennard from University College London (UCL) and Oliver Rapf, Dr. Judit Kockat and Dr. Sheikh Zuhaib from the Buildings Performance Institute Europe (BPIE), with support from Thibaut Abergel and Michael Oppermann from the International Energy Agency (IEA), and support from Martina Otto, Sophie Loran, Nora Steurer and Natacha Nass from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) for the Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction (GlobalABC)

 

 

 

2020-07-09
The Building System Carbon Framework
The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)

The built environment is responsible for almost 40% of the global energy and process-related CO emissions. To meet the Paris Agreement and limit global warming to 1.5°C, we need to reach net-zero emissions across all activities in the building and construction system. The goal is for all new buildings to operate at net-zero emissions by 2030 at the latest, and for all buildings to operate at net zero by 2050.

This report proposes a new framework that can be used as a common language for carbon emissions, by all actors across the built environment. Using a common metric and a full life-cycle approach, the WBCSD Building System Carbon Framework facilitates collaboration across the value chain, where common solutions can be developed and implemented to help achieve system decarbonization.

It is neutral on materials and solutions, bridging embodied and operational carbon, which is a vital prerequisite for reaching net zero in the built environment. The framework also enables each user to identify the best emissions-reduction strategies for their part of the value chain and allows the stakeholders to make informed decisions based on clear and transparent information. 

2019-11-01 | UNEP
Emissions Gap Report 2019
UNEP

This is the tenth edition of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Emissions Gap Report. It provides the latest assessment of scientific studies on current and estimated future greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and compares these with the emission levels permissible for the world to progress on a least-cost pathway to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement. This difference between “where we are likely to be and where we need to be” has become known as the ‘emissions gap’.

2020-01-01 | Edgar Hertwich, Reid Lifset, Stefan Pauliuk, and Niko Heeren.
RESOURCE EFFICIENCY AND CLIMATE CHANGE - SUMMARY FOR POLICYMAKERS
UNEP, IRP

This year, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) published the tenth edition of its Emissions Gap Report, which revealed that the world must immediately begin delivering deeper and faster greenhouse gas emission cuts to keep global temperature rise to 1.5°C. To achieve this goal, we will need to use the full range of emission reduction options, including the implementation of material efficiency strategies.

The International Resource Panel (IRP) has been providing insights into how humanity can better manage its resources since 2007. Its research shows that natural resource extraction and processing account for more than 90 per cent of global biodiversity loss and water stress and approximately half of global greenhouse gas emissions. This new IRP report, Resource Efficiency and Climate Change: Material Efficiency Strategies for a Low-Carbon Future, commissioned by the Group of 7, points to exciting new opportunities to reduce these impacts through material efficiencies in homes and cars.

Climate mitigation efforts have traditionally focused on enhancing energy efficiency and accelerating the transition to renewables. While this is still key, this report shows that material efficiency can also deliver big gains. According to IRP modelling, emissions from the material cycle of residential buildings in the G7 and China could be reduced by at least 80 per cent in 2050 through a series of material efficiency strategies. A more intensive use of homes, design with less materials, and improved recycling of construction materials are among the most promising strategies.

2020-05-01 | German Sustainable Building Council - DGNB
CLIMATE POSITIVE: NOW!
German Sustainable Building Council - DGNB

This brochure produced by the German Sustainable Building Council details the path from climate neutral buildings to climate positive. It includes case studies of climate positive buildings from Singapore and Germany. Finally, it outlines the elements of a climate action strategy. 

2016-01-01 | ENERGIES 2050
GUIDE DU BÂTIMENT DURABLE EN RÉGIONS TROPICALES: TOME 1, STRATÉGIES DE CONCEPTION DES NOUVEAUX BÂTIMENTS
OIF/IFDD

The guide of sustainable buildings in tropical regions aims to bring some answers to the environmental, economic and social issues linked to a massive urbanization process and to buildings’ design and conception methods that are often unfitted to tropical regions. It has been designed to serve as a reference for professionals of the construction sector, and more generally, of the built environment, as well as to decisions makers in the relevant areas. More globally, it aims to be a tool for teachers, lecturers and students in building design and construction. It is finally an invitation for everyone to question its professional practices and contribute to the development of more resilient, sober in resources and with low GHG emissions infrastructures. The first part of this guide focuses on designing new buildings, while the second part focuses more on refurbishing the existing building stock.

2016-01-01 | ENERGIES 2050
GUIDE DU BÂTIMENT DURABLE EN RÉGIONS TROPICALES: TOME 2, STRATÉGIES DE CONCEPTION DES NOUVEAUX BÂTIMENTS
OIF/IFDD

The guide of sustainable buildings in tropical regions aims to bring some answers to the environmental, economic and social issues linked to a massive urbanization process and to buildings’ design and conception methods that are often unfitted to tropical regions. It has been designed to serve as a reference for professionals of the construction sector, and more generally, of the built environment, as well as to decisions makers in the relevant areas. More globally, it aims to be a tool for teachers, lecturers and students in building design and construction. It is finally an invitation for everyone to question its professional practices and contribute to the development of more resilient, sober in resources and with low GHG emissions infrastructures. The first part of this guide focuses on designing new buildings, while the second part focuses more on refurbishing the existing building stock.

2013-01-01 | IEA
MODERNISING BUILDING ENERGY CODES
IEA

Going beyond traditional buildings energy codes (new approaches): Governments need to check compliance and enforce their building energy codes. The ultimate objective of building energy codes should be to move buildings from net energy consumers to net energy producers. By increasing the stringency of energy requirements each time building energy codes are updated, it is possible to move towards nearly zero-energy consumption for the overall building, including all its appliances and equipment. Using renewable energy sources from the building itself and other neighbouring buildings can help with this transformation, and is key to achieving net energy production from buildings.

2011-01-01 | IEA
TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP: ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS: HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT
IEA

A roadmap responding to government leaders’ requests for more detailed analysis regarding future deployment of energy-efficient heating and cooling technologies. It outlines a set of strategic goals, actions, and milestones to reach higher levels of market penetration around the world by 2050.

2016-01-01 | EIA - US Energy Information Agency
INTERNATIONAL ENERGY OUTLOOK 2016, WITH PROJECTIONS TO 2040
EIA - US Energy Information Agency

The report provides a set of projections that might happen given the specific assumptions and methodologies used for any particular scenario. (Page 101-112: One chapter about Buildings sector energy consumption.)

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