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2017-05-31 | World Green Building Council
FROM THOUSANDS TO BILLIONS - COORDINATED ACTION TOWARDS 100% NET ZERO CARBON BUILDINGS BY 2050
World Green Building Council

The report - which is the first major output of our Advancing Net Zero project - highlight how every building on the planet must be 'net zero carbon' by 2050 to keep global warning below 2°C, and crucially, it sets out the actions that business, government and the NGO sector must take to achieve this. The report can be downloaded here.

LE BÂTIMENT DANS LA TRANSITION ÉNERGÉTIQUE
Responsabilité et environnement

The building sector in the energy transition (bastract in english from page 110), in France, Germany, Europe

2015-01-01
ASEAN PLAN OF ACTION FOR ENERGY COOPERATION (APAEC) 2016-2025
ASEAN

ASEAN Plan of Action For Energy Cooperation (apaec) 2016-2025

Plan for Energy Efficiency (including building) pages 30-34

2018-02-01
THE BOTTOM LINE: BUILDING CODE ENERGY PERFORMANCE TRAJECTORY PROJECT
Australian Sustainable Built Environment Council (ASBEC), ClimateWorks Australia

The National Construction Code is a ready-made policy instrument to influence the energy efficiency of new buildings and major renovations. Improved building energy efficiency presents a win-win-win solution, reducing stress on the electricity network and supporting a least-cost pathway to decarbonisation while also delivering cost savings and improved comfort to households and businesses. Improvements to the Code can have a large impact because new construction adds up fast: More than half of the buildings expected to be standing in 2050 will be built after the next update of the Code in 2019

2018-08-01
WORLD GREEN BUILDING WEEK GUIDE
World Green Building Council

How to get involved in World Green Building Week 2018

2018-08-31
ZERO ENERGY BUILDING DEFINITIONS AND POLICY ACTIVITY - AN INTERNATIONAL REVIEW
International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation

Building energy efficiency policies are an important tool in addressing energy and climate policies. There has been tremendous technical and policy activity in recent years aimed toward improving building energy performance, with a focus on getting to very low energy buildings and targeting “zero” energy or emissions buildings. A variety of governments have established

ambitious, and sometimes aspirational, policies and targets for zero energy buildings (ZEBs) to become standard or commonplace. This report, intended for energy and buildings policy-makers, provides an overview of relevant definitions covering all types of zero energy or emissions buildings, regulatory policies aimed to push those standards, implementation approaches and market progress where available, and lessons learned.

2017-11-01
EMBODIED AND WHOLE LIFE CARBON ASSESSMENT FOR ARCHITECTS
Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)

This paper introduces architects to carbon assessment in the built environment and its application through the RIBA work stages. It makes the case for architects’ role in reducing carbon emissions to mitigate climate change, explains the key concepts of embodied and whole life carbon and recommends the use of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) methodology for undertaking detailed carbon assessments (RICS Whole life carbon assessment for the built environment professional statement 2017). To date, this is the most comprehensive and consistent approach available to the industry.

2017-11-01
[RICS] WHOLE LIFE CARBON ASSESSMENT FOR THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)

Climate change is one of the greatest environmental challenges of our time. Global warming due to anthropogenic or ‘human-generated’ greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to the atmosphere, referred to as carbon emissions (see 2.1), may have severe adverse environmental, social and financial effects around the world if temperature levels continue to rise. International treaties and initiatives, the most important being the Paris Agreement (COP21) adopted in December 2015, aim to restrict the impact of global warming by mitigating carbon emissions. Reducing carbon emissions also contributes to limiting resource depletion and reducing pollution. Sizeable carbon emissions arising from the built environment are attributable not only to the use of built assets – operational emissions (Scopes 1 and 2) – but also to their construction – embodied emissions (Scope 3), see Appendix 2: Glossary. Operational emissions result from energy consumption in the day-to-day running of a property, while embodied emissions arise from producing, procuring and installing the materials and components that make up a structure. These also include the lifetime emissions from maintenance, repair, replacement and ultimately demolition and disposal. More detail on the terminology with respect to embodied, operational and whole life carbon is given in 3.2.4. The built environment industry has so far been addressing mainly operational emissions via reduction targets in building regulations (Part L), planning requirements by local authorities and sustainability assessment rating schemes (BREEAM, LEED, etc.) with the embodied aspect of carbon emissions not being fully addressed. To acquire an overall understanding of a built project’s total carbon impact, it is necessary to assess both the anticipated operational and embodied emissions over the whole life of the asset. Considering operational as well as embodied carbon emissions together over a project’s expected life cycle constitutes the whole life approach. A whole life carbon approach identifies the overall best combined opportunities for reducing lifetime emissions, and also helps to avoid any unintended consequences of focusing on operational emissions alone. For example, the embodied carbon burden of installing triple glazing rather than double can be greater than the operational benefit resulting from the additional pane. Therefore, whole life carbon needs to be effectively integrated into the sustainability agenda in order to achieve a lower carbon future.

[BPIE] Future-Proof Buildings for All Europeans
2019-07-07
[BPIE] FUTURE-PROOF BUILDINGS FOR ALL EUROPEANS
Buildings Performance Institute Europe (BPIE)

Two-thirds (65%) of the European building stock was built before 1980: about 97% of the EU’s buildings must be upgraded to achieve the 2050 decarbonisation goal, but only 0.4-1.2% are renovated each year.

A more efficient, technically equipped and smarter building stock could be the cornerstone of a decarbonised energy system.

Buildings have the potential to be at the forefront of providing flexibility to the energy system, through energy production, control, storage and demand response, as well as green charging stations for electric vehicles. This can only happen if a systemic upgrade of the building stock is achieved.

The recent amendments [2018/844] to the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) [2010/31/EU] set a clear direction for the full decarbonisation of the European building stock by 2050. It provides a clear goal for Member States and the tools to achieve it.

However, implementation is rarely a straightforward task:  this comprehensive toolkit provides guidance, tips, case studies and templates to support and inspire EU Member States to meet this challenge.

Long-term renovation strategies, financing of renovation, EPCs and building renovation passports, smart readiness indicator and how to calculate energy performance: the publication focuses on articles were requirements evolved or were added.

Read more in this link

 

2019-06-29 | Oliver Rapf, BPIE
THE ZERO CARBON AND CIRCULAR ECONOMY CHALLENGE IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT – POLICY OPTIONS FOR THE EUROPEAN UNION AND ITS MEMBER STATES
Buildings Performance Institute Europe (BPIE)

Getting on track to limit global temperature increase to 1.5°C, as was agreed in Paris back in 2015, would not just be good for our climate, but first and foremost for all citizens. What changes to the European policy framework and new initiatives could be prepared and implemented in the coming years?

This paper on the zero carbon and circular challenge in the built environment puts forward several policy recommendations. In order to achieve the net-zero carbon goal by 2050, adapting the built environment is paramount: the EU estimates that the climate change-related damage to infrastructure could grow tenfold under a business-as-usual scenario.

The paper advocates the need to come up with a comprehensive strategy for the building and construction sector which should build on the principles of sustainability and circularity. It also highlights the societal benefit generated by energy renovation and building upgrades. The paper touches upon several key aspects of the circularity challenge, namely, building design, the construction material challenge, urban biodiversity and buildings in the energy system.

Changing how we construct, heat and cool our buildings will trigger positive change in many neighbouring sectors, including energy and heavy industry, but also in sectors which at first sight may seem less connected, such as health and education. The paper builds on a workshop organised by BPIE earlier this year and which gathered organizations in the energy field: Climate KIC, DG Connect, DG Environment, Eurima, EuroACE, Institute for European Studies, IUCN, RAP, ROCKWOOL Group, United Technologies Corporation, Wageningen Environmental Research, and the BPIE Board of Directors.

Read the paper here

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