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2023-02-01
cove.tool

The 2030 Challenge is a national effort to encourage the building industry to prioritize energy efficiency and reduce environmental impact. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) adopted the challenge in 2006 and set a goal of using no fossil fuel or greenhouse gas emitting energy by 2030 (Net Zero). The AIA 2030 Commitment encourages architects to meet this goal and submit their project profiles to the Design Data Exchange (DDx) for tracking.

This guide provides best practices for architects to adopt a performance-based design process, setting targets and incorporating energy-efficient strategies in three categories: passive and building envelopes, active and building systems, and renewable strategies. While progress has been made, many projects have yet to achieve the 80% target reduction in energy use, and only a small number have reached net-zero.

Read the guide

2023-01-31
WBCSD & Arup

This report provides insight into strategies and measures companies can deploy to halve embodied carbon emissions, those associated with building materials and construction processes, by 2030. It analyzes how to use and adapt currently available technology, materials and products to reduce emissions as much as possible.

The first part of the report explores early-stage, whole-building decisions and the major impact these can have on the carbon outcome of a particular building project. The second part looks in more detail at the specific choices and measures companies might apply within the individual building layers to maximize embodied carbon reductions.

The report authors call on companies throughout the built environment to implement systemic changes to achieve the shared goal of at least halving carbon emissions by 2030. We need this systemic change now, as we are already planning the infrastructure that will be built in 2030. For the built environment, 2030 is today.

Download it here

2022-12-31
IPCC

The WG III sectoral fact sheets give a snapshot of key findings distilled from the relevant Chapters. This fact sheet is focused on buildings.

Action in 2020-2030 is critical to fully capture the mitigation potential of existing and new buildings. In developing countries, the largest potential is in new buildings, while in developed countries the highest potential is within the retrofit of existing buildings.

Download the fact sheet and read the full chapter

 

2022-11-21
Ministry of Urban Development and Housing, Ski Lanka

This report - Sri Lanka Roadmap for Sustainable Housing and Construction 2020 – 2050 - presents the findings of the Sustainable Building Construction Country Assessment for Sri Lanka (SBC-CA) and a Roadmap for Sustainable Housing and Construction and achieving NDCs in the construction industry in Sri Lanka. It examines the current status, and potential opportunities and challenges for adopting Sustainable Building Construction (SBC) practices and policies. The Country Assessment and the Roadmap are structured on the approach laid out by the ‘Global Alliance for Building Construction (GlobalABC) Roadmap for Buildings and Construction 2020-2050, where 8 Action Areas have been identified for the transition towards sustainability in the Construction Sector: Urban planning, New Buildings, Existing Buildings, Building Operations, Appliances and Systems, Materials, Resilience, and Clean Energy.

Download the roadmap here.

2022-11-09 | BPIE, UCL
GlobalABC/UNEP

The Global Status Report for Buildings and Construction (Buildings-GSR) is a flagship publication of the UNEP-hosted Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction (GlobalABC). The Buildings-GSR provides an annual snapshot of the progress of the buildings and construction sector on a global scale and reviews the status of policies, finance, technologies, and solutions to monitor whether the sector is aligned with the Paris Agreement goals. It also provides stakeholders with evidence to persuade policymakers and the overall buildings and construction community to take action.

What is new in the 2022 Buildings-GSR

  • Buildings and construction: disruptions and challenges facing the buildings sector in 2022 
  • Global Building Carbon Tracker: Are we on track towards the Paris Agreement Goals?
  • Updates on building codes and building decarbonisation in Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs)
  • Status of investment in building energy efficiency
  • Deep dive on:
    • Africa (regional focus)
    • Building materials (topical focus)

The 2022 Buildings-GSR finds that 

  • Despite a substantial increase in investment and success at a global level lowering the energy intensity of buildings, the sector’s total energy consumption and CO2 emissions increased in 2021 above pre-pandemic levels. Buildings energy demand increased by around 4% from 2020 to 135 EJ – the largest increase in the last 10 years. CO2 emissions from buildings operations have reached an all-time high of around 10 GtCO2, around a 5% increase from 2020 and 2% higher than the previous peak in 2019. 
  • The buildings and construction sector is not on track to achieve decarbonization by 2050. And the gap between the actual climate performance of the sector and the decarbonization pathway is widening.
  • Global energy price volatility and rising interest rates are likely to hamper investment in building decarbonization by governments, households, and businesses. 

Download our 2022 Buildings-GSR and read more!

 

Watch our video "Is the Buildings and Construction Sector on Track to decarbonize? 2022 Buildings-GSR.

2022-09-30 | Chiara Delmastro, Tanguy De Bienassis, Timothy Goodson, Kevin Lane, Jean-Baptiste Le Marois, Rafael Martinez-Gordon, and Martin Husek
IEA

The Tracking Report on Buildings published by the International Energy Agency in September 2022 indicates that the buildings sector is "not on track"

In 2021 the operation of buildings accounted for 30% of global final energy consumption and 27% of total energy sector emissions (8% being direct emissions in buildings and 19% indirect emissions from the production of electricity and heat used in buildings). Both energy consumption and emissions rebounded to above 2019 values, following the drop in 2020 from Covid-19 restrictions.

Minimum performance standards and building energy codes are increasing in both scope and stringency, and the use of more efficient and renewable energy technology in buildings is accelerating while the power sector continues to decarbonise. Yet, the buildings sector needs more rapid change to get on track with the Net Zero Emissions by 2050 Scenario. This next decade is crucial to implement the necessary measures, in particular for all new buildings and 20% of the existing building stock to be zero-carbon-ready as soon as 2030.

Read the report to learn more. 
 

2022-07-15 | Ryan Colker, Diana Fisler, Lucas Toffoli, Alyssa Watson
Advanced Building Construction Collaborative

The highly fragmented current building code landscape and regulatory barriers hinder the adoption and scaling of advanced building construction practices, including off-site construction. In 2021, the International Code Council (ICC) and Modular Building Institute (MBI) created Standards 1200 and 1205 to reduce complexity of codes and improve code implementation and enforcement on off-site construction, off-site manufacturers, contractors, and officials who need clearer compliance pathways.  

This brief focuses on problems in the current code reality and details how these new standards can address barriers to more efficient, off-site construction that can support lower-carbon buildings. The work incorporates valuable elements and insights from members of the ABC Collaborative Working Group on Codes, Standards, Permitting, Testing, and Accreditation. 

2022-02-24 | Anne Svendsen, Pimmie Cordova Schultz
Danish Energy Agency

This Roadmap has been developed by the Danish Energy Agency - DEA in close cooperation with the Indonesian Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources – Directorate General of New Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation (Direktorat Jenderal Energi Baru Terbarukan dan Konservasi Energi) and a group of consultants (Viegand Maagoe A/S from Denmark and Chakra Giri Energi Indonesia from Indonesia). It is based on three stakeholder consultations that took place in the end of 2021 (see annex 1 with list of involved stakeholders). This Roadmap will provide orientation and guidance to public and private key stakeholders in the Indonesian buildings and construction sector as well as non-governmental organizations and civil society. The identified targets and actions build on consultations with the building and construction sector, experts at national level and recommendations from international experts.

2022-07-25 | Dr.-Ing. Mira Conci, Alicia Carvajal, Oliver Burgess, Alexa Waud, Juan Lopez Aranguren, Jacqueline Oker-Blom, Celia Puertas, Charlotte May, Manuel Alméstar, Rufus Grantham
EIT Climate-KIC

EIT Climate-KIC and partners have designed the Handbook: Bio-Based and Circular Buildings for Healthy, Clean Cities as an interactive manual and a tracking instrument. It contains information resources and step-by-step processes to help and align local stakeholders’ efforts around reducing embodied carbon emissions in buildings, understand and explore circular practices, and influence changes in the supply chain towards bio-based materials, such as timber – which are more sustainable than the current use of concrete and steel. 

The Handbook supports all actors in the building’s value chain to understand metrics used for decision-making . In doing so, it enables stakeholders to develop benchmarks, to track and evaluate indicators over time; to visualise the processes involved and understand how they need to evolve to lead to different outcomes ; and finally, to create models for collaborative decision-making towards shared goals.

2022-07-11 | John Michael LaSalle, Valerio Micale, Pedro de Aragão Fernandes, Alke Rabinsa Haesra, Eyerusalem Masale, Paul Rosane, Muhammad Ery Wijaya, Muhammad Zeki and Priscilla Negreiros
Cities Climate Finance Leadership Alliance

"Financing Net Zero Carbon Buildings" is the output of an exercise that aims to build the foundation for future work by the Cities Climate Finance Leadership Alliance (the Alliance) through a structured approach to analyze the challenges and priorities relevant to cities in decarbonizing the buildings sector. It is not an exhaustive study of zero carbon buildings, but rather a guide for future alliance work and exercise to build in-house knowledge.

Read the paper here.