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2022-01-14
The Adaptation Imperative for Buildings
PEEB

Buildings – our homes, schools, offices - are at risk from extreme climate events such as floods, storms, heatwaves, droughts, soil erosion or wild fires. Developing countries and poorer populations, which are more exposed and more vulnerable to disasters, are disproportionately affected by climate change. Among the 100 fastest growing cities in the world, 84 are already at an extreme risk from climate change. Failure to adapt buildings can threaten socio-economic development. Yet, adaptation of the building sector remains largely unaddressed.

PEEB’s new briefing, the Adaptation imperative for Buildings, demonstrates the importance of implementing climate adaptation and mitigation in tandem to address current climate threats and avoid worst future impacts. Synergies between mitigation, adaptation and development goals in the building sector are numerous: passive cooling, flexible design, local materials, nature-based solutions or water conservation can both improve the resilience of buildings and reduce their environmental impact while increasing quality of life and local employment. These synergies must be brought to wider global attention in order to scale up action.

With over 10% of all investments worldwide, development banks can play a major role in scaling up low-carbon and resilient buildings by raising awareness, setting new standards and building capacities. The briefing presents a set of recommendations and case studies to help development banks mainstream climate adaptation and mitigation across their investments in partner countries.

2021-12-23
Embodied Carbon - A hidden heavy weight for the climate
PEEB

10% of emissions from energy come from building materials and construction. We need to rethink how we construct our buildings. From resource-efficient designs with a longer lifetime, circular economy approaches and “urban mining” to increasing the market share of alternative building materials and decarbonising conventional materials like cement and steel, the solutions are there.

This PEEB Working Paper summarizes the key facts on embodied carbon, and presents practical strategies during planning, design and construction, as well as for building materials.  To promote action on embodied carbon, it lays out how policy and financing can address this. 

2021-10-26 | JLL - Esha Bhasin, Sonal Jain, Phoebe Lewis
Green Building Principles: The Action Plan for Net-Zero Carbon Buildings
World Economic Forum

Collective action must be taken to accelerate the decarbonization of buildings, which contribute 38% of all energy-related greenhouse gas emissions. Green Building Principles: The Action Plan for Net-Zero Carbon Buildings offers a set of 10 principles to help companies deliver net zero carbon buildings and meet key climate commitments.

Developed with JLL, the Principles and Action Plan outlined in this document aim also offer implementation strategies to decarbonize buildings at a portfolio level. This Action Plan draws on existing recommendations and signposts to an array of current targets to deliver this set of Principles at a global level while allowing for adaption to local contexts.

2021-12-17 | Sepehr Foroushani, Rob Bernhardt, MarkBernhardt
On Use Of The Reference Building Approach in Modern Building Energy Codes

This paper On Use Of The Reference Building Approach in Modern Building Energy Codes has just been published in Energy & Buildings.  Although the data used in the study is for homes in British Columbia, Canada, the use of the reference building approach to code compliance is widespread in Canada, the US and Australia in addition to being permitted by some rating systems in those countries and New Zealand. The findings of the study illustrate the importance of using outcome based, whole building performance metrics to achieve policy goals, as recommended by GlobalABC, the UN Framework Guidelines and other sources.

Established practices die hard, even when they fail to deliver results. The use of the reference building approach continues in Canada and elsewhere, with Canada planning to continue its use in the national model ‘net-zero ready’ building code for 2030. Please note, as explained in the paper, the phrase ‘reference building’ has a different meaning in the EU context, enabling the EU to avoid the performance gap identified in this paper.

2021-11-08 | ADEME, Resallience, French Ministry of Ecological Transition
Adaptation of the Building Sector to Climate Change: 10 Principles for Effective Action
GlobalABC Adaptation Working Group

UN Secretary-General calls latest IPCC WG1 Climate Report a ‘Code Red for Humanity’, stressing ‘irrefutable’ evidence of human influence, and that “climate impacts will undoubtedly worsen”.

Data collected over the recent decades shows that the climate is currently changing at an unprecedented pace due to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Human-induced climate change is already affecting many weather and climate extremes in every region across the globe. Evidence of observed changes in extremes such as heatwaves, heavy precipitation, droughts, and tropical cyclones, and, in particular, their attribution to human influence, has strengthened since 2007, as shown in the latest IPCC report1. Climate change will have especially severe consequences all over the world for a built environment designed for steady conditions and for the communities that inhabit them. Understanding these consequences will require the use of projected climate data from RCP models on different spatial scales and several time horizons.

Therefore, GlobalABC is proposing “10 Principles for Effective Action” to policy 2 makers and practitioners to join forces and spread climate change adaptation actions in the building sector and willing to track annual progress.

To support these 10 Principles please contact the GlobalABC Adaptation Working Group at globalabc.adaptationwg@o-immobilierdurable.fr.

Download the 10 principles below!

2021-11-03
Underpinning the role of One-Stop Shops in the EU Renovation Wave - First Lessons Learned from the Turnkey Retrofit Replication
BPIE

BPIE published a report in the framework of the H2020 project Turnkey RetrofitUnderpinning the role of One-Stop Shops in the EU Renovation Wave - First Lessons Learned from the Turnkey Retrofit Replication.

This report discusses the replicability of the renovation journey and highlights 12 key recommendations for how the European Commission can support an effective roll-out of one-stop shops across the European Union.

Find more information and the full report here !

2021-11-02
Market Transformation Levers for a Net Zero Built Environment
WBCSD

The built environment is a critical sector to tackle if we are to reach the climate mitigation targets set out in the Paris Agreement, as it represents close to 40% of global energy-related GHG emissions (almost 14 Gt per year) and 50% of global resource extraction.  
Action and collaboration are needed immediately from all stakeholders to achieve the paradigm shift to a net-zero and resilient built environment. If action is not taken today, we risk locking emissions and vulnerability into our buildings and infrastructure that will become increasingly costly to mitigate in the future. (Climate Action Pathway, Human Settlements, Marrakesh Partnership for Global Climate Action)
To decarbonize the built environment, whole-life carbon emissions (operational and embodied) must be assessed and tracked on all new and existing developments to determine how best to minimize emissions while ensuring resilience for the future. System decarbonization requires demanding less material, minimizing energy use, and implementing low-carbon and renewable heating, cooling, material and construction technologies at scale, while promoting the decarbonization of the energy, transportation, and material manufacturing sectors (e.g. steel and cement) in parallel. 

Recognizing this, GlobalABC's Work Area 3 'Market Transformation' identified two enablers and three fundamental levers to drive the market transformation along the full value chain of the built environment.

Download the article below to discover them!

2021-11-01 | Sintali
A Guide to Green Retrofit

Over 75% of existing buildings will still be in use by 2050. They usually have poorer energy performance and contribute to exceptionally high levels of green gas emissions. There are many obstacles to overcome, however the challenge of decarbonising existing buildings is one we must meet if we are to get close to making the carbon reductions we need. This new white paper from Sintali explores how EDGE can be used as a strategic tool, allowing building owners and operators to bring their entire building stock to net zero in a quantifiable, transparent and streamlined manner. It shows how you can realise the benefits of decarbonising, including access green finance, and provides case studies of companies around the world who have begun the journey to net zero.

2021-10-19
2021 Global Status Report for Buildings and Construction

The Global Status Report for Buildings and Construction is a reference document published by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP)-hosted Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction (GlobalABC). This year's edition finds that in 2020, the sector accounted for 36 per cent of global final energy consumption and 37 per cent of energy related CO2 emissions, as compared to other end use sectors. While the level of emissions within the sector are 10 per cent lower than in 2019, reaching lows not seen since 2007, this was largely due to lockdowns, slowing of economies, difficulties households and businesses faced in maintaining and affording energy access and a fall in construction activity. Efforts to decarbonize the sector played only a small role.

Global Energy and Emissions 2021 Buildings GSR

Collectively, stakeholders in the sector must seize the opportunity that the COVID-19 economic recovery period offers to foster transformation for decarbonizing the sector. The sector must simultaneously meet a projected near-doubling of global demand for energy services in buildings and at least a doubling of floor space as developing economies continue to respond to the growing demand for building floor space, access to energy services and economic activities.

 

2021-09-17 | Ursula Hartenberger (PathTo2050), York Ostermeyer (Chalmers University), Thomas Lützkendorf (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology)
The Building Passport: A Tool for Capturing and Managing Whole Life Data and Information in Construction and Real Estate

Environmental targets for the construction sector have become ever more stringent. Many stakeholders on both the supply and demand sides are increasingly calling for accessible and reliable data and information on buildings. Policymakers and market participants alike see the development and use of Building Passports as a way of overcoming current data gaps and data barriers, helping to capture, administer and manage building-related data and information across the whole life cycle. The overarching goals of these practical guidelines, which represent the collaborative effort of a global Task Force of public and private sector experts, are to illustrate the value of developing holistic, multi-dimensional Building Passports. At the same time, the guidelines reflect key aspects of past discussions about how to make them work in practice, drawing on the experiences of stakeholders and on existing and emerging similar-type initiatives. As such, these guidelines are a supporting tool that:

- explain the approach of a Building Passport for a more systematic and coherent approach to building-related data and information.

- help build capacity for improved data capture and management through practical recommendations and real-life examples of good practice.

- ensure a minimum of harmonization / standardization.

- foster more widespread market transformation through progressive digitization of building-related data and information, thus creating greater overall sectoral transparency and opportunities for the development of new business models and tools.

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